J.Herbin "1670" 50ml Ink Bottle

J.Herbin

15026T

J.Herbin was established in 1670 in Paris near the towers of Notre Dame.

Ink production started during the First French Empire.The inks were used by Napoleon Bonaparte, and then by his son, the King of Rome. During the 19th Century, Herbin participated in many great internation exhibitions including the London exhibit in 1832 where he was given an award for the exceptional quality of his inks and waxes.

Today, Herbin inks are widely used and internationally renowned.

To celebrate the 340th Anniversary of the brand, the "1670" ink was introduced especially for this event.

There are 5 colours :-

Rouge Hematite 

With a dark red colour and earthy tone, Rouge Hematite ink is a reminder of the historic colour of the Herbin logo and the sealing wax used by members of the royal courts.

The sealing wax on the bottle is reminiscent of the Herbin wax used for the "grand cru" wines of France.

The design on the box represents the life of J. Herbin. The ship, anchor and palm tree represent navigation and discovery. The crown is a reference to the red sealing wax used by the royal court.

 Bleu Ocean

The deep blue ink with a golden sheen recalls the sea voyages of J. Herbin to the Mughal Empire of India. In those days India was a primary supplier of indigo dye. Bleu Ocean takes its inspiration from those adventurous journeys.


Emeraude de Chivor

J. Herbin is said to have kept an emerald in his pocket during his voyages as a good luck charm. These precious gemstones have been treasured for centuries for having magical healing properties and as protective talismans. One of the purest emerald deposits in the world, the Chivor mine in the Andes was discovered in the middle of the 16th century by Spanish conquistadors.

Chivor emeralds were much in demand, and the royalty of India, Persia and Turkey sought the New World treasures once the gems arrived in Europe. Emeralds were enormously popular in the Mughal Court of India, whose rulers referred to them as "Tears of the Moon" because of their opaque transparency.

Emeraude de Chivor is an elegant emerald green ink with flecks of gold.

Stormy Grey

Stormy seas are the inspiration for J. Herbin’s 1670 ink, “Stormy Grey.” Its colour is a deep coal grey (anthracite) with flecks of gold. On his many voyages, J. Herbin encountered dark and wild oceans. The fine golden flecks in the ink are meant to invoke both strikes of lightning across the water, and also its dark and mysterious depths.

Caroube de Chypre

It is said J. Herbin was fond of dried carob pods as a healthy food during his voyages. As with other merchants, he traded or purchased them in Cyprus.

Carob trees have been cultivated in Mediterranean countries since ancient times. Carob pods were known for their therapeutic properties and were marketed throughout Europe as the "black gold of Cyprus."

This new anniversary ink is called "Caroube de Chypre" - Cyprus Carob - because of its deep brown colour. Caroube de Chypre is a dark brown ink with light red reflections and sparkling gold effect.





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